Best decision ever – skip the architect

The architect role is sold as outstanding important in product development efforts – especially when IT is involved. But I’ve learned some lessons.

The secret.de case – skip the architect

Roughly 3 years ago we started a new business – a high class and exclusive casual dating site focusing exclusively at women. The technical decision was soon done by picking Ruby on Rails v3 as web framework and mongoDB as persistence layer. It was a radical shift away from our current technology stack – pure java and postreSQL.

When we started with Sprint 0 we hired external people to support us. One person acted as the Ruby on Rails trainer for 1 week – to get our people up to speed. At the time we started we had 1 skilled Ruby on Rails person focusing on frontend development and one not-so-experienced person with Ruby on Rails focusing on backend development. The remaining team were skilled java developers. The other external people were one Rails nerd and an architect. During the sprints, it turned out that the architect didn’t have any clue about Rails nor pragmatic architecture. He started to document our project with ARC42 templates … so, we decided to put him aside soon. Leaving the team – without lead. No architect, no direction, no guidance – no hope?

Not at all. What happened? The team started to accept the fact that there’s no over-brain available. No-one making decisions for them. No-one giving direction. And, magically, they took over the ownership for the overall project. Each and every design decision was discussed within the team. Planning II got a total new meaning to the team. Sure, quite some mistakes were made – but most of them due to non-experience with the new technology stack. The Rails nerd was out-phased as soon as the platform went live – after 3,5 month of development.

So, in self-empowered teams there is no need for an explicit architect role. Naturally in team configurations there are more experienced people and less experienced people. A good team will distribute the overall responsibility for good architecture work over all heads. Everybody will carry a piece fitting their experience and willingness to contribute. Plus – you will not run into knowledge distribution problems. Everybody is involved. Knowledge is flowing. New persons can be introduced without a lot effort. The teams credo “fix it if it breaks” led to a low-maintenance and up-to-date system. So, I’ve a fast, fast, fast running application and a real high-performing team.

For me – in the end – the best decision ever was to skip the architect.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.